The Wishing Game

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Synopsis

Kirkston Abbey is no place for weak or sensitive boys. Jonathan Palmer can’t believe his good fortune when Richard Rokeby seeks out his friendship. Rokeby is everything Jonathan is not: wealthy, strong, handsome, aloof. Even the professors can’t touch him. As the bond between the two boys deepens, Rokeby grows increasingly possessive. Soon, Jonathan comes to realize that there is something not quite right about his new friend. Something a bit off-kilter. Something… dangerous. What started out as an innocent game among schoolboys turns into a nightmare as Jonathan finds himself powerless to stop Richard from unleashing a diabolical force that threatens to consume them all.

 

Praise for The Wishing Game

 

‘The setting is genuinely chilling, and the atmosphere of menace and sterility riveting’ – Daily Express

 

‘Patrick Redmond’s chilling debut novel is a first-rate page-turner . . . Other writers may be hailed as the new Patrick Redmond in years to come’ – Daily Mirror

 

‘Such is the hard-edged skill of Redmond’s writing that the carefully structured revelations about the past have a bitter and compelling power’ – Times Literary Supplement

 

‘This impressive first novel powerfully evokes the terrible effects of cruelty and bullying, and the unravelling nightmare is sustained with suspense and pace’ – Sunday Mirror

 

‘Assured writing sets up evil to overcome the weak in this deft, Hitchcockian portrayal of a malevolent microcosm of warped power’ – Publishing News

 

The Wishing Game is dark and gripping, like an anaconda. I could not pull myself away: an astonishing debut’ – Tim Rice

 

‘Thanks to Redmond’s masterfully subtle fore-shadowing, a brooding sense of impending disaster is maintained throughout his gripping suspense thriller’ – Publishers Weekly

 

‘Redmond has a way of making individuals seem both more human and more vile as new levels of detail are unearthed. Even his villains manage to become more understandable, vulnerable and complex as the book marches on . . . An impressive debut’ – Washington Post

 

‘Redmond’s teenage characters are well-drawn, and the small universe of the school becomes a real emotional landscape, where the pupils are credited with passionate and complex emotion’ – Independent on Sunday